Tag Archives: seeds

Hidden Histories filming

Hi all, just wanted to update everyone on the filming situation; I now have the material for 6 short videos (one to two and a half minutes in length), which I shall be assembling soon.  I have Greg on the Astbury camera, Liz on the capacitor, Dom on the seeds, Rita on the educational posters, Becky on the printing press, and myself on the hygrometer.

When Mike’s back I’ll be filming him on the Newlyn-Philips machine, and Emily will be doing her short introduction, the transcript of which she has posted below.  I will then put the pieces together, edit where necessary, and we will have 8 short videos to go up on our YouTube channel.

This should be a nice project to coincide with the installation of the exhibit in the Sadler building.  If anyone has any other objects they want to do, please let me know, because I’m hoping this can be an ongoing, on-growing part of the museum which will serve to consolidate and strengthen our online presence.

UPDATE: You can view all of these 1 minute videos on our YouTube channel here.

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Leeds and Seeds

Hello, I thought I would upload my pictures alongside a draft of the script I am writing for the video. I will then expand on this for the display description, so comments on either aspect (video/display description)  will be appreciated. (Any comments regarding the Coco de Mer in the background will not be considered irrelevant)

“Leeds was amongst the first universities in Britain to recognise that investigation of plants could go well beyond taxonomic classification. In 1907 it became one of a very few universities to offer a chair of Botany, a position which has since been held by many illustrious names. The first was Vernon Herbert Blackman who is now most widely remembered for his investigation of plant development, particularly how one plant can fertilise another and produce offspring. For this kind of research seeds are themselves important for producing the experiment subjects. However I have principally chosen this item for display in the museum because a well stocked seed collection was really the heart of any Botanical department. Here we see only a portion of a collection that would have run to hundreds of species and varieties, some common others very rare. The vast number of ways in which this collection can be put to work is staggering. Not only can these seeds be scrutinised for physiological and anatomical purposes, but they can form the basis of investigations into inheritance, fertilisation, classification and a whole host of other important biological questions. What is perhaps most interesting however is that there is every chance that one or two of these specimens could still be grown today. Some seeds have managed to germinate after decades or even centuries in storage. It makes you wonder what valuable genetic material might be hidden inside.”

Right then, what do you think? As it stands it takes me just over a minute to say this, going at a slower than normal rate. Have I crowbarred in the ‘hidden’ theme a little too brutally? Also, are we still on for filming these on the 18th?

UPDATE: You can view the finished video on the seed collection at the University of Leeds on our Youtube channel here.